9. November 2007

German Bundestag Decides to Implement Data Retention


Starting next year, all communication providers in Germany will have to store all connection data for six months.


This includes:

  • Phone calls: Date, time, length and involved numbers of all phone calls (landline, mobile or VoIP)
  • In case of mobile phones additionally the location of the phone at the time of the call, the IMSI code of the phone and SMS connection data
  • Internet access: IP address, date, time and length of the connection, and the line which was used. (to be clear: not each individual ip connection. Only date and time of your connection to the internet and which ip you were using)
  • E-mail: e-mail-addresses involved and the header of each e-mail

The content of the communications is not stored.

The bill had been heavily criticized. Privacy advocates had organized demonstrations agains the bill in all major German cities at the beginning of this week. In October there had already been a large domonstration with thousands of participants in Germany’s capital Berlin.

All opposition parties voted against the bill. Several members of the opposition and several hundred private protesters announced a constitutional complaint.

This sucks…

More details

Topics: Germanypoliticssurveillance

11 Comments »

  1. [...] legislation is coming into effect in Germany (despite strong opposition from just about everyone) whereby all [...]

    Pingback by Enfeeblement » Blog Archive » German Legislation Archives All Spam — 10. November 2007 @ 2:47

  2. So does this mean that they would have to record every connection inbound also ??

    lets do a full connection portscan on EVERY ip in the country .. and see how much hard drive space we can take up ..

    Comment by jack — 10. November 2007 @ 3:58

  3. [...] Nu har det blivit Tysklands tur att logga email, SMS och allt annat som Thomas Bodström tyckte var nödvändigt för att hitta [...]

    Pingback by Tyskland övervakar « Basic personligt — 10. November 2007 @ 10:00

  4. jack: No, fortunately they are not that crazy.

    They only log when you connect yourself to the internet and which ip you are using then.

    Comment by Flo — 10. November 2007 @ 12:35

  5. [...] kreativrauschen: This sucks… [...]

    Pingback by Reaktionen zu dem Überwachungsstaat « Ralphs Piratenblog — 10. November 2007 @ 17:59

  6. [...] seems fairly ironic that today, on the very same day, only 18 years later, the German government decided on a law that gives up one of the most basic constituent rights of all Germans: Every person needs [...]

    Pingback by Eric Bodden » November 9th, in 18 years from freedom to global surveillance — 10. November 2007 @ 23:57

  7. [...] haben wir ihn: hier, hier, hier, bezeichnenderweise nicht mehr auf den Titelseiten von denen und [...]

    Pingback by subtitles » Blog Archiv » Der Salat — 11. November 2007 @ 1:36

  8. Hello my friends :)
    ;)

    Comment by tawquarewah — 14. May 2008 @ 15:41

  9. [...] has just been proven in Germany. Since the beginning of this year, communication providers are required to record who communicated with whom and when (but not the content of the communication). This data is stored for six months and available to law [...]

    Pingback by Data Retention Effectively Changes the Behavior of Citizens in Germany « Creation Noise — 5. June 2008 @ 10:31

  10. [...] Germany, data retention is already in place for communication channels such phone calls, Internet access and e-mails. A recent survey (German [...]

    Pingback by /dev/random » Blog Archive » The Data Retention Effect on Citizens Behavior — 6. June 2008 @ 14:18

  11. [...] has just been proven in Germany. Since the beginning of this year, communication providers are required to record who communicated with whom and when (but not the content of the communication). This data is stored for six months and available to law [...]

    Pingback by A Chill On The Internet | Stuck In Traffic — 27. November 2011 @ 3:16

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